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liabilitys of the medicare and social security systems, the position of the united states verges on bankruptcy. because although we have a $10 trillion debt, the unfunded liabilities are $100 trillion. that's something that seems to me one can't likely dismiss. >> rose: a program note. we intended to show you this evening interviews with our friends malcolm glad well and job john grisham but because of the economic story, we will show you those interviews at a later time. tonight, orszag and ferguson when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: peter orszag is here, he is the director of the office of management and budget. called more than just the budget director by the "new yorker" magazine, he's deeply involved in president obama's ambitious domestic agenda as well. that includes health care, energy policy and entitlement reform. he's focus tong country's long-term fiscal health. the administration recently released projections showing deficits growing by $9 trillion over the next ten years. sp
of radicals. it indicates that radicalization of violence are taking place in the united states. one year ago, the department of homeland security issued a warning lead to an al qaeda plot against a railroad and commuter network. it linked to a new yorker who radicalized the violence around new york city before travelling to pakistan to seek out an opportunity to court is a paid in violent issue had -- violent jihad. four men were outside a community center in riverdale. they were radicalized in the united states. july 2009, seven men were arrested by authorities in north carolina. they possess weapons and 27,000 rounds of ammunition with plans to attack the marine base in virginia. they were inspired by al qaeda and radicalize in the united states. this past september, a man was arrested as part of an al qaeda conspiracy to attack locations in new york city with hydrogen peroxide based explosives. it was one of the most serious plot sense of 9/11. he lived in the united stated during his formative years before departing for pakistan. later that same september, a 21- year-old from new york's
people, including ethnic and religious minority, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> but even as the president called for access to information, china was tightly controllg it. the meeting with a carefully screened group of students who were coached beforehand was not broadcast live across the country, and while it was available on two big national internet sites, it was hard to hear. and one big website, the xinhua news agency told people that the obamauñ÷ live, but then on the screen apparently fails to deliver on that promise. in tonight's "lead focus," we take an in depth look at the obama visit and its significance, beginning with the presidents day from melissa chan of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the president is now in beijing, but earlier in the day, he was in shanghai for his town hall meeting. it's the favorite format for the american president, a conversation with the people, talking about u.s./china relations. >> our world is now fundamentally interconnected. the jobs we do, the prosperity we build, the environment we protect, the securit
who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states. but we do have one. that's pretty of cour pretty p obvious. we have taken too heightly danger of the propaganda in the united states and the extent to which the mosques in the united states can reinforce these attitudes. so it's something that requires a lot more effort on the part of the bureau. >> paul: what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young muslim american to go over to al-qaeda? i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode, because it seems that some of them were radicalized if that is the right word by the invasion by ethiopia of somalia in 2007 that the united states supported. can it be one event like that? >> yes. there are many factors that come into play and there has been excellent studies looking at islamic militants, particularly those in europe. and you do tend to esee a pattern. first, there tends to be something deeply personal that strikes that believer and it r radicalizes him and makes him believe that the muslim community at large, what is almost a virtual
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
trial in the history of the united states. that's my conclusion after studying it as close as i could. and that's the report of my book. i try to explain in my book why i believe that to be true, and i will try to give you a suggestion on what i believe that to be true in my remarks here tonight. john brown's trial was the first trial in the history of the united states to receive massive attention from national media. it was the first trial in which a defendant was executed for treason against a state, as opposed to treason against the united states. it was the first trial in which an accused defendant appealed to a higher law to justify violent crimes. it was a trial that involved more than just a determination of an individuals guilt or innocence, according to laws laid down in statute books and in case reports. it was a trial that pitted two starkly different moral visions against each other. one of these visions defended the institution of chattel slavery as traditional, necessary, just and worthy of protection from outside interference. particularly, from the outside interferenc
this was an utter, unmitigated disaster for the security of the united states and for the interest of the united states in the dangerous world we live in. the sanctimonious comments by general holder today are this, self-serving and self-centered. we ought to be concerned of what is in the interest of the united states of america. you nailed it absolutely right. what good is there to be gained by trying these mass murderers, war criminals in civilian courts with rules designed for conventional crimes committed by conventional criminals as general mukazie once said. they'll challenge the way they were treated and what about the chain of evidence and did we have all the constitutional nicities in a war? they're going to proclaim outrageous treatment and lie about it because they've got the world stage and this will serve to recruit additional jihaddists because they're going to attack america throughout this entire episode, the sorry episode and they're going to try and get support throughout the muslim world for their cause by ex-core eighting -- excoriating the united states of america and our v
the united states and cuba. a key congressional committee is discussing lifting the ban on americans traveling to cuba. could the embargo fall next? we talk to the committee chairman and to a leading human rights advocate with a scathing report on cuba. plus, differing viewpoints from two officials who have just returned from there. >>> but first, cnn's nick robinson reports on the new robotic warfare over afghanistan and pakistan. it's conducted from thousands of miles away in suburban america. >> reporter: look around this room. it's been hit by a missile fired from an unmanned aerial vehicle, a uav, more commonly known as a drone. the family living here say children were killed in this u.s. attack. the children were never the target, but in pakistan's tribal border region, the death spelled trouble for u.s. foreign policy. where many believe that fighting with drones is cowardly. >> last year, one of the most popular songs in pakistani pop culture was a song whose lyrics talked about how america fights without honor. >> reporter: launched from just over the border in afghanistan,
. that is what happened in the united states and what is happening in europe and what is happening in asia. i think at one time we could have another bubble and as bubble is going to be bigger from the other. the united states, now the cost of financing their debt is about $50 billion a year. looking at $900 billion in 2020. obviously the problem of that accelerating and putting investors at risk. in dubai we have a big bubble and i think abu dhabi has to put the burden of correcting a miscalculation. >> professor, what do you think is abu dhabi's position. it is not entirely clear whether they will underwrite the whole thing or pick and choose which of the debts they are going to deal with. >> obviously -- they say they cannot -- they probablyavto put first of all a new regulation a new role and they have to tighten the belt. they cannot just bail out and then go into another problem. but so far, the central banker of dubai -- liquidity, but they said they have to pick and choose. they don't have to reschedule all of that but they have to schedule some of that. this is going to be a new equa
and representatives. there are more women serving at any time. there are 17 women serving in the united states senate and 74 women serving in the united states house of representatives. of those congresswomen currently serving, 14 are currently members of the c.b.c. since the first representative of color, patsy minching of hawaii won election in 1964, a total 39 women of color have served. 30 of these women were elected after 1990. and a total of 38 have served in the house of representatives where carol mostly brown of illinois is the only women to serve from 1993 to 1999. the first african-american was sharle chisholm. and there are some states who have never elected a woman to congress, delaware, iowa, mississippi and vermont and i look forward to having women from those states join us at some point, madam speaker. there are historic number of women currently serving in congress, including the first woman speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, who was elected speaker in 2007. the 111th congress understands that our nation's laws must include and respond to all our citizens, including women. women in
chance to mention just exactly what we do in the united states that t china. in the-- the minut& >> bill planning with the pres thank you very much. now here's maggie.-- >>> a drug. millions take zetia by merck, but renewing questions about whether it our dr. jennifer ashton is here with go y- this at length this morning b- becauecause so many people do take this this journ 200& for 14 months. som- others were taking an over the counter vitamin. wh >> had cardiovascular risk factors or t attack - they were already on a stat & - pconcont
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
moved back to the united states when i was a baby and lived there till i was five in rochester, new york. this was after it had become safe for war resisters. my father worked in a health clinic in the state, and my mother worked at a cable access channel. they both decided they preferred it in canada. my father preferred the single payer health care system. my father preferred that. my mother was working for the national film board, which is a public institution that allowed her to make the political films that she wanted to make. they left the u.s. because of stayed in canada because of the social programs. >> do you remember when you first learned of this story and it sunk in? >> in canada, you did not have to be rich to get sick. i feel i always knew the story about health care. this was explained to me as a kid. i did understand that it was unfair that people were denied access to medicine because they did not have money to pay. as a doctor, my father preferred to work in a system whereby money did not have anything to do with the care that you received. i feel like i have always k
're unique here in the united states of america. madam speaker, we're a unique people and, yes, we are the progeny of western europe and we're the progeny that came from primarily western european stock and at the time that we received the best that western europe had to offer, we also received a fundamental christian faith as the core of our moral values. and this is a judeo-christian nation, madam speaker. the core of our moral values is embodied within the culture. whether people of whatever church people go to or whether they go to church, wherever they worship or whether they worship, we still have the american people as a culture who understand christian values and christian principles, the judeo-christian values that are timeless. and so i would illustrate that, madam speaker, in this way. that when -- an example would be this, let's just say if an honorable man from texas were to pull into his driveway and his neighbor's dog had gotten loose and ran underneath the tire of his car and if he killed -- if you're in texas or iowa or most of the places in the country, if you run
. one country's success need not co at the expense of another. that is why the united states insists we do not seek to contn china's rise. on the contrary, we welcome ina as a stron and prosperous and sucssful member o the community of nations. >> reporter: answering a qution on internet access ina -- >> unrestcted internet access a source ofrength, and i thinshould be encouraged. i think that the morereely formation flows, the stronger the society beces because tn citizens of countries around the world can hold their own governmes accountable. ey can begin tohink for themselves that generates new ideas. >> reporter: and disssing cooperation on climate change -- >> the united stat and china are th world's two larst emitters of greenhous ges, of carbon that is causing the planet to warm. so unls both of ou countries are willg to take critical steps in dealing with this issue, we wil not be able to resolve it. >> reporter: there's no down china d the u.s. wil be v to workogether on a variety of world problems, but don't expect any major announcements fro this visit. after shangi, the pres
billion or $40 billion of tax revenues and also bring in about $750 billion of cash into the united states. >> how do they do it? >> it's really simple. by what i would call enlightened taxation. right now foreign profits to bring back into the united states have you to pay a 35% tax on it. by implementing a reduced tax, the way it was done in 2004, all that -- all those foreign earnings will come streaming back into the united states. it's estimated to be $750 billion that's outside the united states. corporations don't have to bring it in, but they made -- when they bring it in, it's taxed. by reducing the tax, it encourages those profits to come back, and by doing that, that $750 billion will be spent here in the united states. right now multi-national corporations are cash rich off shore and are cash poor domestically, so when they have to build a research plant, a research facility, where do you think they're building? they build it where the cash is because they can't get it back here into the united states. >> to doubt you bring some of these issues up at the new york fed. you are d
, the answer is i would probably start with something different from what we have in the united states. there is a wonderful book out there called "the healing of america," by a washington post reporter. what we have in the united states is an amalgam of the worst, that just about all of the system that you talked about, we have a little bit from this one, a little bit bad from this one, etc. so you end up with something that cims it is the best health care in the world when the statistics say it is pretty pathetic, the quality of health care and united states. >> you are saying the medicine is pathetic, so what about care? >> the medicine is pathetic, the results are pathetic. and the costs are exorbitant. >> that is very depressing. >> what happens then is that it gets demagogued to death. that is what we're seeing right now. the old things that scare people into tea parties, and from the left, things that are unrealistic. you end up in the same state of political paralysis, and the united states gets into deeper trouble providing something that should be a fundamental right in this
of the international community but fully engage with the international community and the united states is the one who can do the heavy lifting. there is no question about that. >> rose: and john harris of politiceau.com gives us a one-year analysis of the oa administration. >> the idea that president obama and his team were able to somehow transform the map and transform the political geography of this country or the political demography of this country, that just doesn't look to be the case. they did redraw the map in 2008. it was an he norly impressive victory. but that doesn't mean that they have somehow fundamentally altered the landscape in permanent ways. >> and job grisham is here with a new book, a collection of short stories. >> it is more about people. more about the small town people. many of whom are struggling. many of whom have had a lot of miss erie, a lot of hope. it's about small town lawyers and the crazy things they do out of desperation. all stuff i saw firsthand many years ago. >> rose: mohamed elbaradei, john harris, john grisham next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provid
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
to the import of work ahead, and thank you for coming today. may god continue to bless the united states of america. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] >> still to come, a discussion on attorney general eric holder's announcement to hold civilian trial support 9/11 plotters in new york city. after that, today's memorial service for pulitzer prize winner jack nelson. later, another chance to see former president george w. bush reflect on his a-year presidency and decisions made during his administration. the u.s. house is back in session tomorrow at 2:00 eastern for legislative business. live coverage of the house is on c-span. the senate also returns tomorrow, continuing work on fiscal year 2010 federal spending for the veterans department and military construction. majority leader harry reid has said the senate may began its healthcare debate later in the week. the senate will gavel in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. live coverage on c-span2. >> c-span's 2010 student camp contest is here. the top prize is $5,
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
newman is back with us as we wait for the president of the united states. the f.b.i. quickly tried to say no terrorism connection here. at the same time, they're looking at all ends, but not entirely ruling it out. what do you make of that? >> that is standard f.b.i. procedure. i learned that from my mother, who god rest her soul, worked directly for j. edgar hoover and she would bring the files home when we were kids and we learned it back then. this is a professional organization, the f.b.i., and you don't want to rule everything out and don't want to rule everything in. remain calm. assume absolutely nothing and get to the bottom of it while maintaining your -- if you want to go to somewhere else, go ahead. neil: that's fine. i'm not even aware of the time. i'm going to shepard smith as we wait for the president of the united states. >> glenn beck is off today. this is fox news continuing coverage of the tragedy at fort hood. fox news confirms through the military as you just heard 12 people murdered and 31 injured in that shooting rampage at fort hood next to killeen, texas. we can te
years between iran and the united states in geneva last month. he is now involved in the draft agreement between iran, the united states, russia and france to process iran's uranium stockpiles outside the country. there are reports today that progress on the deal is being held up by iran's ongoing internal political crisis. this week dr. elbaradei called the current mont a unique and fleeting opportunity to reverse course from confrontation to cooperation with iran. we want to talk about all of that and i am very pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> charlie, it is great to be here again. >> rose: all right. let me just start. tell me where you think the moment is. >> well, the moment is a historic critical moment, charlie, that this is for the first time i see a genuine desire by the president of the united states and by the iranian leadership to engage in a genuine dialogue. it's after 50 years of animosity, of distrust. and that's why we have this difficulty today. the it is a symbolic gesture but it could be the first step in a broad dialogue that eventually could integ
karzai can become the effective leader that the united states hopes for and needs in afghanistan. can he rid the country of corruption? can he raise an army capable one day of taking over from the unitedtates? these are all key questions as president obama plans the next phase of u.s. involvement in afghanistan. in our lead focus, the afghan election and beyond. we start in kabul with jonah hull of al jazeera english who found that the issue of fraud remains an undercurrent. >> reporter: just a day after dr. abdullah's withdrawal from the race, hamid karzai is declared winner of afghanistan's presidential election. >> translator: we declare mr. hamid karzai, who got the majority votes in the first round, and who is the only candidate in the second round, be declared president of afghanistan. >> repter: the chairman of the country's top electoral body, the independent election commission, said consensus had be reached among his commissioners baseon the law and in the interests of the afghan people. international reaction was led by united nations secretary ban ki-moon in kabul on an unann
, they said, take care of yourself to get reelected. >> the opposite of a democrat in the united states, the difference is a conservative, not a republican. you cannot be -- a republican if you are not against big spending. >> keep thinking that. >> here is what i would say. what i would say is, look at virginia. bob macdonald reached over, not by moderating his principles, but by saying that his principles were not only good for saying, no. he says he wants to grow the economy, but he just wants us to do it, not washington. there is a positive, republican agenda out there. we will see more of that in 2010. >> when i first opted to propose the question, this was slightly more off-base. i want to bring up the idea. i came down here from boston, where republican was a dirty word. not because of the belief system but the reputation. my question is how much opinion is placed in the word, republican or democrat. and how much is in the ideology. how much will this affect things over the last year? how much has that changed? >> it is an interesting attachment to the word republican, as there i
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
would be investigated. this is one many flawed parts of the resolution. the united states will remain a true friend to our ally, israel. so let us call for an open and honest debate with the reputable justice goldstone. let us not act in haste to pass a resolution that in no way achieve our ultimate goal of achieving a lasting peace for israelis and palestinians. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. ellison: may i inquire as to the time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has one 3/4 minutes remaining. mr. ellison: i yield one minute to the gentleman from massachusetts. >> i ask permission to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> this resolution should not be coming before us. there is an anti-israel bias in the united nations, but it should be the responsibility of every member of this house to bring it back to the peace talk table. this resolution does not do that. this resolution heightens the rhetoric of division. regardless of what you think of the goldstone report, it makes an
to terrorist organizations, that directly threaten the security of the united states, it is essential that our government agencies are sharing information about such individuals. what happens been in the media these last days about major hasan and his behavior, if determined to be true, is very disturbing. such allegations as justifying suicide bombing on the internet, lecturing fellow soldiers using jihadist rhetoric, warning about adverse events if muslims were not allowed to leave military service, repeatedly seeking counsel from a radical islamic imam with well-known ties to al-qaeda. attempting to convert some of his patients who were suffering from stress disorders to his distorted view of islam and finally, was the fbi sharing with the army what it knew about hasan and aulaqi and was the army sharing what it knew about hasan with the fbi? while these patterns are preliminary and will be confirmed by the the investigations that are being conducted, it is very similar to what we experienced at fort bragg in the late '90s where we were wrongfully tolerating extremists in our organization w
in israel is likely to increase and the pressure from israel on the united states is very likely to increase. but we have seen in the past that there are precedents that the united states can prevent israel from taking military action, precisely because of the fact that israeli military action against iran would spell disaster for the united states in the region, which has been made very clear by admiral mullen, as well as other military figures in the u.s. so in the past we've seen examples in which the united states actually has successfully prevented israel from taking military action. >> thank you. >>> let's talk about the economy now. the chairman of the federal reserve goes before a senate committee this week as lawmakers consider a second term for ben bernanke. he's getting a headstart on the discussion with an opinion column in today's "washington post." bernanke argues against several moves under way in congress designed to limit the central bank's independence. bernanke's words, we should be seeking to preserve, not degrade, the institution's ability to foster financial stability a
to assume and they don't like having all the pressure brought on by the united states to ratchet up the level of chinese obligation. >> rose: also this evening, french chef eric ripert of the famous new york restaurant la bernadine. >> so when i came to new york, we're talking about 20 years ago. i came with a very french way of seeing food with a very strong mediterranean influence and then i discovered japanese cuisine. i discovered chinese cuisine, i went to brooklyn and visit the stores where they have all the spices. i traveled throughout the u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he
industrial zone between egypt, israel and the united states. it has helped to boost our trade and export to the united states. but in the meantime, we are also working in new channels to support some initiatives between the two countries. and that's what i hope we can conclude in washington on monday. >> and what would you like to hear in order to walk away and feel that that was successful? >> well, we are still waiting to hear from the administration a stronger message about opening up in trade, not just with egypt, also with the rest of the world. i think that is a big question hanging at the moment in terms of the position of the administration, towards liberalization of trade. and i have to admit that this is a worry that we all have in emerging markets at the moment. but i feel confident because of the long history of the relationship between the two countries, that the support for a high level of economic cooperation between egypt and the united states will be materialized during this administration. >> well, it's true, i guess, in the economic slowdown, you know, countries across
on several cases against those who seek to terrorize the united states using the full range of authorities and capabilities available to us. just as president obama is using our military diplomatic, legal, law enforcement and moral force to make america safer and more secure, the attorney general is exercising his responsibilities in consultation with the secretary of defense to determine where and how best to seek justice against those who have attacked americans here at home and around the world. after nearly eight years of delay, may finally move -- be moving forward to bring to justice the perpetrators and murderers from the september 11 attacks. i have great confidence in our attorney general. the capability of our prosecutors, our judges, our juries and the american people. in this regard. i support the attorney general's decision to it pursue justice against khalid shaikh mohammed and four others accused of plotting the september 11 attacks and go after them in our federal courts in new york. they committed murder here in the united states and we'll seek justice here in the united s
making news while chas advertising the north koreans. the attorney general back home in the united states dominating today's headlines with stunning news that the 9/11 hijackers are coming back to new york to stand trial, steps from the scene much their infamous crime. >> i'm confident in the ability of the courts to provide a fair trial just as they have for over 200 years. the alleged 9/11 conspirators will stand trial in the justice system before an impartial jury under long established rules and procedures. i would like to assure the american people that we will prosecute these cases vigorously and we will pursue the maximum punishment available. these were extraordinary crimes and so we will seek maximum penalties. >> geraldo: the decision to bring five terrorists to new york for a trial created a tsunami of comments from republicans. >> these people are qualified as terrorists around should not be tried in civil court and given the same rights and privileges that an american citizen should. >> this was not just another murder in the city of new york here. this was an act of war and
and the other is that jesus isn't just for christians in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble bause we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's not because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to
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